Some models provide storage for toys and other baby items in zippered side pockets, fabric shelves, hook-on fabric storage pouches, and small clip-on parent-organizer bags. Of course those features aren't necessary, but if you want to use them, look for storage that is big enough to actually hold something. Storage compartments should attach, or be built into the outside of the play yard, so they're out of your baby's reach. One deluxe example is the S1 by Safety 1st Satellite Premier Playard - Pegasus (about $128), which comes with attached shelves and a small laundry hamper.
Very pleased. I have a big baby boy and I was unsure of the stability before i purchased this. He's now 14m old, 31 inches tall and 35 pounds. He does fine with it. We've had it for a few months now and we love it. Very sturdy. I read that the stickers were easily peeled off and could become a choking hazard, so I simply never applied them. Easy to assemble. It sits in a circle or square/rectangle with no extra pieces or panels. I also read mixed reviews on the suction cups for securing to non carpet floor. We have faux wood laminate and I never bothered putting them on. Still, no problems. I'm a big time reviewer before purchasing. I can tell ya...this is a great buy.
Bassinet: Most playards include a bassinet, which is a convenient option if you’re going to have your baby sleep in it while using it as a travelling nursery. The bassinets in playards differ; some are full-sized and run down the length of the playard, some have options like a canopy which is great if you’re going to be using it outdoors, and some have a rocking motion.
Most play yards are designed for portability—to fit through a door, be moved from one room to another, or folded up to fit in the trunk of your car. Many are rectangular, usually 28 by 40 inches. A basic model such as the Cosco Funsport Travel Play Yard (about $55) has mesh on all sides and comes with a travel bag. Another lightweight model, Graco's Pack ‘n Play Playard/Circle Time (about $57), weighs about 20 pounds.

 Yes you may have loose pieces you have to watch out. If you are not using bare flat floor you better take the sucking cups out and have your kid in sight if he is the kid that gets all in mouth. Yes I had to get more than a couple of times the arms out of a jam. It tend to happen just at a certain time when their arms are just the size to get in between but they out grow that phase rather quick. I give them 5 stars. Because it does the job! My kids could not been more safe out of it! I never get them loose around the house and so I avoided all kids of dangerous situations with doors, windows, chemicals that look like candy and the sort. I have 5 kids, when I thought we were done with kids, (3) we gave the panels away. That is how much they last. We had to buy it again with child number 4. We moved back and forth because of my husband type of job and as many times we moved this play pen acomodated EVERYWHERE! And different forms sometimes just like a big wall. The old company who had the rights for the design had music built in, I liked it but was annoying to most parents so they got rid of it. very little things in life can be just perfect, the closest is the jumperoo so far but this one has been a life saver for a longer time. I do recommend it, just be watchful. I read people having problems with the bear decal so I post a video with my husband putting one. I hope it helps

As these books tend to be short on footnotes, I couldn’t actually track down any such study. And what a study it would have to be: large-scale, “longitudinal,” intensely observational, randomized. Otherwise, how would we really know how much time children had spent in playpens (self-reports tend to be biased), what sort of households the children lived in, not to mention what might have occurred in the years between the time spent in playpens and the time of the reading and writing tests at age 7 or 8? Which left me wondering: Is the fear of playpens all hype? Just a hysterical outcropping of our anxious style of modern parenting?
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Some basic models may be easier to cart around because they don't have any extra parts. You can also look for bags that leave the play yard's wheels free, so the whole thing can be rolled once it's packed up. If you plan on taking frequent trips (especially by air), you might want to consider a heavy-duty bag that you can buy separately, such as the Rover Gear Easton Travel Yard Bag (about $34).
Be sure to check the floor pad. It should also be no more than 1-inch thick, snug-fitting, and firm enough to protect your baby from falling or rolling into the loose mesh pocket that can form between the edge of the floor panel and side of the play yard (a suffocation hazard). We think it's safer when models have slots on the floor that allow the mattress's Velcro strips to be inserted and secured on the outside of the play yard, making it difficult for a baby or toddler to lift the mattress and possibly become trapped under it. Avoid models with a mattress that fastens to the bottom of a play yard only with Velcro pads that a child can access from the inside. Use only the mattress or pad that comes with your play yard.
The quality is certainly there. The mesh seems very strong and its very easy to collapse and put away. The same goes for putting it together. It just folds in or out. The reason for not giving it 4 stars is the padding on the floor. We had to put additional patting as its too hard. So keep that in mind when buying this play pen. I would recommend for its portability and the zipper at front.
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