The Lotus Travel Crib and Portable Baby Playard is a highly portable and lightweight playpen at just 11 pounds. This playpen is so easy to set up—it takes just 15 seconds! Breakdown is somewhat more difficult, but see the video below for instructions. The Lotus folds up into a backpack, which you can transport easily on all your family adventures. The sides of the playpen are made from soft, see-through mesh so you can watch baby play; the side even has a fun door that zips and unzips so baby can crawl in and out while supervised. More than just a playpen, the Lotus comes with a soft mattress, making it a safe and comfy place for baby to nap. Some consumers do not like that the mattress rests directly on the ground. Additionally, you will need to buy the Guava Family quilted sheets, because the mattress is not a standard size. This playpen is more expensive than average, at $198.
The dimensions are great and hence offers enough capacity for your kids and yourself included. It measures 48 inches wide, 26 inches tall and 14 square feet. The foldable frame and lightweight materials of construction make it highly portable and easy to store. The floor boasts of weather-resistant canvas, and the sides are made of mesh for clear visibility.
Had no clue about this policy with Delta. The fine print isn’t exactly clear, so I’m guessing your miles may vary depending on your gate agent and airport. I am going to have to investigate the other airlines (somehow I’m guessing they aren’t as generous). Of course – don’t forget Southwest’s 2 free bags that make this all a non-issue if you choose to fly Southwest.

As your baby gets older they will love to unzip the side and climb inside like their very own little play tent. With the included convertible backpack straps this play yard is easy to carry especially as it only weighs 11 pounds. The manufacturers boast of a 15-second setup, which really is hard to beat, and makes this the easiest pack ‘n play to assemble.
As Ann Hulbert documents in Raising America: Experts, Parents, and a Century of Advice About Children, this sort of confused and conflicted debate has long been a touchstone of the parental advice genre. In Anxious Parents, Peter Stearns notes that where parents once put children in playpens to safeguard them from dangerous household equipment, as that household equipment was made more accident-proof, the playpen itself soon began to be seen as the source of danger—both literally, as in a series of high-profile recalls of poorly designed playpens and playards, and figuratively, as a symbol of damaging neglect.

Nice to keep baby out of trouble at home. Once he became mobile we had to do an "upgrade" as we noticed he was starting to hit his head on the X shaped metal bars. We tried some alternatives but the best so far was wrapping the metal bars with pool noodles (see picture). You'll need 8 pool noodles and some cuts (buy some extra in case you mess up). Use 2/3 of a pool noodle to wrap the internal bars and the remaining 1/3 to wrap half of the external bar. The pieces will also need a longitudinal cut along the length to fit the bar in. You'll also need some small cuts in the middle of the longer piece to fit the center rivet, where the mesh is attached to the bars. We got the pool noodles at the dollar store nearby for less than $10 and since ... full review
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