For Dr. Marcie, you can't start practicing too early. While your baby's in the womb, you can begin building habits that will work not only when things are fine and lovely, but also when you're facing an epic potty-training crisis. Building a solid foundation for interacting with your kids can make life a lot more fun, because you know what to expect — and so do they.

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Truth is, the parenting culture has had mixed feelings about the playpen seemingly since it was invented. An ad in a 1925 newspaper, for example, for a device called the “Kiddie Koop” (reputedly designed by Buckminster Fuller), encapsulated the tension: “There is no thrill like that of holding and caring for a baby in your arms,” it began. “Yet the modern mother with her manifold duties must—simply MUST—forego such maternal joys at times, or the ‘regulation of household affairs’ will suffer.” Playpens would continue to be debated, not in the pages of scientific journals but in the mothering advice columns of newspapers. In a 1943 edition of the Spokane Daily Herald, Myrtle Meyer Eldred touted the benefits of playpens: “Not only is the child free of possible physical injury but his behavior is not subjected to constant punishment, since what he does in his guarded play-place does not annoy the parent.” In a 1957 article in the Chicago Tribune, the writer, after first asking the reader to remember “the great hue and cry raised against the play pen a few years back,” then goes on to cite a report by Dr. E. Robbins Kimball noting various advantages of the playpen (including the fact that it “gives nervous mothers relief.”) In 1966, a columnist was asked in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette if mothers used playpens “as a lazy excuse to keep their babies out of the way”; while in an article in that same paper a decade later, a reader of the “Parents Ask” column wondered about “some psychologists who are against playpens.” The column’s author, Louis B. Ames, noted the reader was probably referring to Burton White’s The First Three Years of Life (“there is no way of keeping most children from being bored in a playpen for longer than a very brief period of time”), and then went on to advise that “the ordinarily lively and intelligent baby does not have be entertained by others during all his waking hours.”
Overall i love this product! Adjustable to the shape of your liking, lightweight but sturdy enough that it doesnt move as baby bangs and shakes it. Plastic so I feel safe if baby happens to fall or bump into it, and I love the locking door. The reason why i didnt give it 5 stars is of the rolling balls. I wish it were made out of sodyer material because if baby happens to fall on it, they could reall get hurt. And the stickers that came with it I didnt put it on because I read it can peel off and mine eats anything he gets in his hads so i thought it's best to leave it out for now. I also took out the phone receiver toy because the baby puts it in his mouth and could get hurt if he fell forward. The best part that I like is I can fit in it too! If the baby cries for me, ill just hop in and lay it out while he plays around.

Had no clue about this policy with Delta. The fine print isn’t exactly clear, so I’m guessing your miles may vary depending on your gate agent and airport. I am going to have to investigate the other airlines (somehow I’m guessing they aren’t as generous). Of course – don’t forget Southwest’s 2 free bags that make this all a non-issue if you choose to fly Southwest.

I love this play yard!!! So let me start off by saying with our first child we had the similar product that Summer Infant makes. In order to set that one up or take it down, you had to flip the playard over , and move like 8 straps on and off the “legs”. We only used it with 1 child, for about a year, and only indoors with no excess force used on it. 2 of the straps broke and Summer Infant wouldn’t stand by their product and give me a replacement because I didn’t have the receipt or could prove it was still within their “warranty” (it was a gift from my mother in law). I have since boycotted Summer Infant because it was a $100 product that didn’t last. We also only used it on carpet and small holes were forming in the bottom canvas. It was ... full review
This thing is great. I have it set up as a wall spliting my living room in half basically. The panels are sturdy so hold up great when my daughter pulls herself up standing against them. As i have it set up as a wall i did anchor it to the room walls byattaching some Velcro to the room wall with a screw at either end then wrapping the Velcro around a piece of each end section. This has allowed me to create a baby safe area with all her toys and then an adult safe area with no toys to trip over, and itlet meget away with not baby proofing the entertainment center.
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