I used this playpen at work for a year. Purchased when my daughter was almost a year old. I had to take it in and out of my car everyday at work and I was worried that it wouldn't hold up due to it being hollow plastic. I was pleasantly surprised! It held up so well that I will be able to use it again for the next baby. My daughter is now two and knows how to stack things so she can climb out and she's tall. However she has never been able to figure out how to unlock the gate. All the toys on the toy panel still work and have held up despite my daughter being rough with them. None of the connector pegs have come off during transport. I really worried they would pop off since they weren't solid and were jostled in my car all the time!
The quality is certainly there. The mesh seems very strong and its very easy to collapse and put away. The same goes for putting it together. It just folds in or out. The reason for not giving it 4 stars is the padding on the floor. We had to put additional patting as its too hard. So keep that in mind when buying this play pen. I would recommend for its portability and the zipper at front.
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Whatever its name, the concept of the playpen reveals yet another fault line in the politics of anxious parenting, as I found via a simple inquiry—whether the playpen was in or out of vogue—at Urbanbaby.com, a site that combines the neurotic firepower of Woody Allen’s 1970s oeuvre with the conviviality-tinged-with-hostility of the Mos Eisley cantina in Star Wars. Reading through the various replies (including a few from parents-to-be who shared my curiosity), the opinions seemed to fall roughly into two camps: Against were those who said playpens are overly confining, that it is better to child-proof one’s home instead, that playpens are “the first compromise to good parenting” (inevitably followed by television, etc.); on the other side were those who averred that playpens are safe and necessary spaces to park toddlers while getting things done, that it is folly to suggest that one’s parental eyes can always be trained on the child, that far from restricting creativity playpens enhance a sense of independence, etc.
Fisher-Price Ocean Wonders Aquarium Playard - This is the benchmark for comparison. When I had my first child, he was only in our house so this served as his napper and playard in the family room when we didn't want to trek to the bedroom. My first loved it. Napped easily in the bassinet, changed his diapers in the bassinet, easy to clean, set up, take apart, and the mobile was awesome - ran on batteries and had good songs. This was THE ultimate playard. In fact, we brought this back out ... full review

The reversible napper and changer is a great way to save a bit of space and even money. All you need to do is turn the napper by 360 degrees and it turns into a changer. There is a secure switch that can be only controlled by an adult, which facilitates this movement. There is also a toy bar, which is also completely detachable, to hang your baby’s toys.
❤【DIFFERENT SHAPE】 You can adjust the 8 panel baby playpen design and make it into whatever shape you need. The baby Play yard’s one panel with activities on it to catch baby’s attention well. The baby fence has plenty of room for learning walk and even laying. There's lots of room for parents to join with their toddler and lots of room for toys. Baby fence baby playpen play yard.
Whatever its name, the concept of the playpen reveals yet another fault line in the politics of anxious parenting, as I found via a simple inquiry—whether the playpen was in or out of vogue—at Urbanbaby.com, a site that combines the neurotic firepower of Woody Allen’s 1970s oeuvre with the conviviality-tinged-with-hostility of the Mos Eisley cantina in Star Wars. Reading through the various replies (including a few from parents-to-be who shared my curiosity), the opinions seemed to fall roughly into two camps: Against were those who said playpens are overly confining, that it is better to child-proof one’s home instead, that playpens are “the first compromise to good parenting” (inevitably followed by television, etc.); on the other side were those who averred that playpens are safe and necessary spaces to park toddlers while getting things done, that it is folly to suggest that one’s parental eyes can always be trained on the child, that far from restricting creativity playpens enhance a sense of independence, etc.

Only had a little while, but really not worth the money. Very flimsy can’t even lean against it when sitting in it. I bought it so I could let my son play while I did things near by; however I can not leave him unattended bc the way it’s made has perfect slots for them to be able to put feet in and climb up. Material is hollow plastic so it squishes also if pressed hard.
 Yes you may have loose pieces you have to watch out. If you are not using bare flat floor you better take the sucking cups out and have your kid in sight if he is the kid that gets all in mouth. Yes I had to get more than a couple of times the arms out of a jam. It tend to happen just at a certain time when their arms are just the size to get in between but they out grow that phase rather quick. I give them 5 stars. Because it does the job! My kids could not been more safe out of it! I never get them loose around the house and so I avoided all kids of dangerous situations with doors, windows, chemicals that look like candy and the sort. I have 5 kids, when I thought we were done with kids, (3) we gave the panels away. That is how much they last. We had to buy it again with child number 4. We moved back and forth because of my husband type of job and as many times we moved this play pen acomodated EVERYWHERE! And different forms sometimes just like a big wall. The old company who had the rights for the design had music built in, I liked it but was annoying to most parents so they got rid of it. very little things in life can be just perfect, the closest is the jumperoo so far but this one has been a life saver for a longer time. I do recommend it, just be watchful. I read people having problems with the bear decal so I post a video with my husband putting one. I hope it helps
Cost: Don’t go for the most expensive products thinking that it is full of adorable qualities. Also, don’t go for cheaply made products just because they cost low. Go for moderate prices and start your selection there. This balance of equation will ensure that you don’t waste your hard earned money and that you don’t take your kids safety for granted.
We purchased 4 sets of these to setup an outdoor play pen for our 1 1/2 year old triplets. Makes for a reasonably sized play area, and so far they haven't though to really try to scale them. Not really many places they could grab a foot hold which is nice. I love the flexibility of how they attach, makes it easy to arrange the space however you want. Very lightweight too, which makes for easy moving when we have the lawn mowed. Can just drag it out of the way.
She continued: “It’s as if you asked a climate-change scientist whether the fact that you bought a Prius would make a hurricane less likely in New Orleans this summer. Carbon makes a big difference and so does care-giving, but not at that scale. Of course if you kept a baby confined in a playpen and never took him out that would probably make a difference, but nobody actually would do that.” While science does suggest crawling strongly influences the way babies think and learn, she points out “babies in playpens are crawling and exploring too, of course.” Her last bit of advice? “Parents should try to think not ‘How will this affect my baby in the long run?’—who knows?—but ‘Is this helping my baby and me to thrive right now?’ ” That, she says, depends on what you and your situation are like—and only you know that.
This play area is great! It gives me some peace of mind when I can't be near my 9 month old son all the time, while doing house work. He loves it! I put a little couch in there and his toys. I even put a nice toddler mirror on the inside with gorilla tape and it's awesome! He is always laughing at himself. He can't pull it off. He's tried! Wonderful purchase! Good sturdy playpen!
There’s no right or wrong pick for a playard here. If you only need a portable play space for when your baby or toddler is on the move, choose a basic model. If you’d rather have one that can sub in as a diaper changing station or bassinet, select a playard with more bells and whistles. If you do decide a playard will make your life as a parent easier, be sure to add one to your registry today!

Bassinets and changing-table inserts can be useful. Just remember that you should never leave your child unattended within those devices in a play yard—no matter what type (or feature) you are using. Your infant may be content to sleep in her bassinet insert, but she's safest sleeping in a full-sized crib. That's because your child may begin moving around and could fall out of the bassinet, either onto the floor, or to the floor of the play yard, causing injury. You'll also need to remove the bassinet or changing station, (or flip the changing station to the outside of the yard, depending on the model) when your baby is in the main part of the play yard to avoid the possibility of the child getting trapped under those attachments.
The Graco Pack ‘n Play with Reversible Napper and Changer Playard is an upgraded version of the basic Pack ‘n Play; it comes with a cozy newborn napping station that flips around, becoming a changing station that easily wipes clean after use to save your back during diaper changes. It is perfect for tight spaces because you’re combining at least two products in one. However, some users have reported that it is somewhat difficult to flip the napper/changer back and forth. This Pack ‘n Play also comes with a storage pocket to stash your extra diapers and wipes, and it has beautiful colors and a stylish design. At $88.90, this product is a good value for all the features it comes with, but it is more expensive than your basic Pack ‘n Play model. This product is not eligible for Prime shipping, and it typically takes one to two months to ship. It’s on the heavy side at 28.3 pounds, so it may not work as great as other playpens for travel. Luckily, this product grows with your baby, becoming a full-fledged playpen when your baby grows out of the napper.

It is a play yard that is made for the various developmental stages of a baby. This means you can use this playard for three subsequent life phases of your baby’s life viz. newborn stage, infant stage, and toddler stage. This is quite evident by the features of the playard. The small napper works great for young babies while the bigger bassinet is made for older infants. The diaper changer snaps out easily, which means you can remove it when it is not being used. You can attach the changer to the side of the play yard, which takes away your worry of having to store it.


When your baby is a newborn putting them low to floor can cause major strain on your back so you'll want to shop for a playard that has two levels so you can have them higher when they are younger and then move them lower when they learn to roll over. This model from the popular Graco line does all of this at a reasonable price and has some added features like a mobile and pockets on the side to store, diaper, wipes and such. 
Be sure to check the floor pad. It should also be no more than 1-inch thick, snug-fitting, and firm enough to protect your baby from falling or rolling into the loose mesh pocket that can form between the edge of the floor panel and side of the play yard (a suffocation hazard). We think it's safer when models have slots on the floor that allow the mattress's Velcro strips to be inserted and secured on the outside of the play yard, making it difficult for a baby or toddler to lift the mattress and possibly become trapped under it. Avoid models with a mattress that fastens to the bottom of a play yard only with Velcro pads that a child can access from the inside. Use only the mattress or pad that comes with your play yard.
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It's easy to put together and take a part. The stickers were hard to place but that's not a big deal to me. My son, now almost 10 months, hates being confined. The play pen was very sturdy but he wouldn't stay in there without crying. I ended up buying another one and using sections of the pen to block off areas of the house. It's not as sturdy when not put together in a closed shape, but it works for us.

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