The pieces were super easy to assemble. Just slide the rods on one piece into the holes on the next piece to connect them. I was a little disappointed that the rods/holes were not hexagonal like the instructions state. That would have locked them into position either straight or at an angle. Instead, the rods/holes are round, so the panels move around (accordion style) and won't stay in a straight line. There are suction cups on the bottom of the panels that might help if you're using it on a hard floor or smooth mat, but they're useless on carpet or textured mat.
Bought this for my 9 month old who is crawling and cruising around his pack and play but needed something bigger. Very happy with this purchase except the suction cups don’t work well on my hard wood floor which was mentioned on the paper instructions but wish it was mentioned on here. That’s pretty much why I bought this one. Still sturdy though when my baby pulls himself up and stands holding on to it. Overall, baby loves it and I highly recommend it!

The word, on the face of it, is rather contradictory, combining play—a word with inherent jouissance—with a suffix that suggests confinement. Given that even pens for livestock have fallen under scrutiny—battery cages for chickens, for example, are critiqued because in them, hens “endure high levels of stress and frustration”—it’s not surprising to find parental discomfort with a product that seems so, well, penitential. Of course, the word yard itself has prison overtones, and when examining a product like the “North States Superyard XT Gate Play Yard” it’s not hard to get some serious Gitmo vibes. (Such misgivings about the playpen are exemplified in sculptor Robert Gober’s X Playpen, a bifurcated enclosure that, as one critic put it, “emphasizes this domestic space’s claustrotraumatic quality.”)


I received all 8 panels as promised in the description from this seller (I noticed some people said they didn't). High quality (he doesn't hurt his mouth of this when he tries to chew on it), it's smooth and easy to assemble. Even if he bangs his head against one of the gates, he isn't screaming as if it was wood - we still watch him in this because he's not old enough to not watch him but he easily moves around without problems. Colors are great, gate works really well, and its a perfect size for us - gives our 9 month old Baby enough room to play with different items but is not so huge its cumbersome in our place. Suction cups work well too (we have wood floors) and even with the ABC mat underneath, there are points where we can still suction it to the floor so it continues to not move. Overall, its awesome.
Now, a simple visit to a site like Babies ‘R’ Us will confirm that, yes, playpens do still exist. But they seem to have been rebranded, for these devices are no longer called playpens. Instead, searching for the term on Babies ‘R’ Us will yield a range of “Pack n’ Plays” (a trademark of the kid-product manufacturer Graco, and which purists insist is less a playpen in the traditional sense than a traveling crib), and various takes on the “playard” (a word that seems vaguely French but is actually a contraction of “Play Yard”). Rather tellingly, a Google search for playpen seems to yield as many entries for contraptions to corral  pets as children.
Most manufacturers make play yards that are designed to move. Many roll on wheels and fold easily and compactly into their own totes, which resemble short golf bags (although less rugged), making them ideal for trips or jaunts to Grandma's. As we've said, basic play yards tend to be smaller (about 28 inches wide) and lighter (about 20 pounds) because they're not loaded with extras. If you can find a model that fits into its travel bag with its wheels exposed, it can make moving through a busy place such as an airport easier. The Chicco Lullaby LX mentioned above does that.
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• You don't need a sheet. Most play yard mattresses, which are thin, can be cleaned, and the bassinet is safer without this extra piece of material, in which a baby could become entrapped. But if you do use one, make sure it is tight-fitting and specifically made for the mattress or bassinet insert on your model. Never use a sheet made for a crib mattress or twin or other size bed.
I have hard wood floors and needed a playpen for my 8 month old daughter who likes to climb everything. I am so happy with the item I purchased and wish I had purchased in sooner. The ease of mind of being able to leave the room with my baby peacefully playing in her pen is amazing. It's large enough that it takes up the good majority of my living room, but not too large. However, it would be easy to remove panels to adjust the size. We never use the gate as it is low enough to step over, but tall enough where she cannot climb over the railing. The gate does move around and can be adjusted to fit whatever shape you need. I have not fussed with the suction cups to get them all to stick down, however, it is sturdy enough without doing so.
•MANUFACTURED 3/5/2018 Complete bedside care center features reversible bassinet and changer all-in-one • Extended use changer allows for more diaper changes, up to 30 lb • With two speeds of vibration to choose from, you can find just the right setting to soothe baby • With four locking wheels the bassinet can be effortlessly maneuvered throughout the home allowing baby to be wherever you are • The canopy offers shade from light while the two soft toys give baby a focal point for playtime
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