This 8-panel colorplay includes a suitable carry handle that makes this north State Superyard easy to take wherever you go. The skid-resistant pads make it easy to use indoors, and it is an ideal choice for the children from six to twenty-four months of age. Good choice for pets as well. Large play of 34.45sqft, Good Quality Pads perfect for wooden floors, and Easy-to-assemble.

This auction is the 8 Panel Safety Playpen. Keep your babies safe and sound in this expandable 8 Baby Playpen. Can be configured in an octagon shape or large rectangle. Full of fun activities including a picture house, ball spinners, play telephone, and a swinging hinged door with safety lock. Need a larger size? You can easily add on more panels to expand it as large as you'd like.
Absolutely beautiful playard baby is due next month and this has all the essentials I need to make it an easier time. At $118 I really couldn't turn this down I haven't used the electronic parts yet as I need batteries (D battery for bouncer and AA for the one on the rail) all in all I would buy this again if I ever need a new one 😍 The may for this is super soft and comfortable for any baby

The debate over the playpen, in the end, seems less about the thing itself than one of the eternal conditions of parental pathos: the fact that children demand so much of our attention and that we cannot always give it to the extent we (and they) would wish. As I’ve been writing this I—a modern father with “manifold duties”—have had to occasionally give time to the nearby girl I’ve stashed in the Fisher-Price “Cradle ‘n’ Swing” (some bylaw must require that children’s product names use ’n’ in place of and), which for all I know may simply be the infant forerunner to the playpen. (My friends nervously and jokingly call it the “Neglect-o-Meter.”) Yes, my lack of attention may be stunting her development—shaving a notch off that IQ—but my failure to write portends more sweeping consequences, like the lack of a roof over our heads.
The word, on the face of it, is rather contradictory, combining play—a word with inherent jouissance—with a suffix that suggests confinement. Given that even pens for livestock have fallen under scrutiny—battery cages for chickens, for example, are critiqued because in them, hens “endure high levels of stress and frustration”—it’s not surprising to find parental discomfort with a product that seems so, well, penitential. Of course, the word yard itself has prison overtones, and when examining a product like the “North States Superyard XT Gate Play Yard” it’s not hard to get some serious Gitmo vibes. (Such misgivings about the playpen are exemplified in sculptor Robert Gober’s X Playpen, a bifurcated enclosure that, as one critic put it, “emphasizes this domestic space’s claustrotraumatic quality.”)

Nice to keep baby out of trouble at home. Once he became mobile we had to do an "upgrade" as we noticed he was starting to hit his head on the X shaped metal bars. We tried some alternatives but the best so far was wrapping the metal bars with pool noodles (see picture). You'll need 8 pool noodles and some cuts (buy some extra in case you mess up). Use 2/3 of a pool noodle to wrap the internal bars and the remaining 1/3 to wrap half of the external bar. The pieces will also need a longitudinal cut along the length to fit the bar in. You'll also need some small cuts in the middle of the longer piece to fit the center rivet, where the mesh is attached to the bars. We got the pool noodles at the dollar store nearby for less than $10 and since ... full review
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