My wife and I bought this play yard for our son because it is the nicest we've seen on the market for the money. This isn't a pet yard, so your child won't look like an animal inside it. It actually has some educational value with the primary colors, so you can start to teach your child the colors upon arrival, then move on to what's inside. You should know, however, that if you want to make it into a square shape with the rounded corners as shown in some of the product images, you need to buy those corner pieces separately. Someone else reviewed this play yard and discovered the same thing when they opened the box. It's one of those things where you open it up and go..."Oh...so it doesn't come with the rounded corner pieces as shown in the photo? You have to buy those separately??!! The manufacturer needs to be clear in the ad description regarding what pieces are included. What you CAN do with what's in the box is make it an 8 panel, 6 panel, or L shape play yard if you wish, without buying additional pieces. Thanks for reading and I hope you find this review helpful.
The debate over the playpen, in the end, seems less about the thing itself than one of the eternal conditions of parental pathos: the fact that children demand so much of our attention and that we cannot always give it to the extent we (and they) would wish. As I’ve been writing this I—a modern father with “manifold duties”—have had to occasionally give time to the nearby girl I’ve stashed in the Fisher-Price “Cradle ‘n’ Swing” (some bylaw must require that children’s product names use ’n’ in place of and), which for all I know may simply be the infant forerunner to the playpen. (My friends nervously and jokingly call it the “Neglect-o-Meter.”) Yes, my lack of attention may be stunting her development—shaving a notch off that IQ—but my failure to write portends more sweeping consequences, like the lack of a roof over our heads.
I have one that I've had for a year with zero issues and an extremely rough toddler. I have tried other gates and fences that were cheaper but just ordered two more of these because nothing compares to the sturdy quality and height of this one. I use it to fence off our computer area, to make him a safe place near our pool and another now around our entertainment center. I don't know what I would do without the versatility of this product.
This is a simple and colorful playpen that you can place at any spot of your choice to make a quick, safe playing enclosure for your baby. The six panels of the playpen latch firmly to one another. They can also be extended to increase the play area with two additional panels sold separately. The base pads do not slip, thus grounding the playpen firmly.

Most play yards are designed for portability—to fit through a door, be moved from one room to another, or folded up to fit in the trunk of your car. Many are rectangular, usually 28 by 40 inches. A basic model such as the Cosco Funsport Travel Play Yard (about $55) has mesh on all sides and comes with a travel bag. Another lightweight model, Graco's Pack ‘n Play Playard/Circle Time (about $57), weighs about 20 pounds.
Rule two? "Do more, because actions count." If you tell your kid you're going to do something, be like Nike and just do it. Parents give a lot of direction when they're unprepared — which is why you have to ask your kid to sit down for a snack like 37 times. Instead, what if you waited until their ants-on-a-log was already on the table, grabbed your little one, and sat them down yourself? According to Dr. Marcie, that helps them learn what it means to listen.
My wife and I bought this play yard for our son because it is the nicest we've seen on the market for the money. This isn't a pet yard, so your child won't look like an animal inside it. It actually has some educational value with the primary colors, so you can start to teach your child the colors upon arrival, then move on to what's inside. You should know, however, that if you want to make it into a square shape with the rounded corners as shown in some of the product images, you need to buy those corner pieces separately. Someone else reviewed this play yard and discovered the same thing when they opened the box. It's one of those things where you open it up and go..."Oh...so it doesn't come with the rounded corner pieces as shown in the photo? You have to buy those separately??!! The manufacturer needs to be clear in the ad description regarding what pieces are included. What you CAN do with what's in the box is make it an 8 panel, 6 panel, or L shape play yard if you wish, without buying additional pieces. Thanks for reading and I hope you find this review helpful.
I love this pen. It's bright, bulky enough so it's sturdy, but not extremely heavy so it's not hard to handle. Easy to put together and take apart. I bought 2 sets to make this pen twice as large. There is so much space to play and I still have so much room for more toys. I actually need more toys for it! I also love the handle on each gate. It allows me to hang crib toys and dangly toys from it. No toxic odors. Only thing I wasn't happy about was that 2 of the plastic feet to hold up the gate, came damaged. It wasn't packaged right, these 2 feet were cracked right down the middle so I took off a star. Also, the activity panel is pretty boring for my 1 and 2 year old. They found it interesting the first couple if days But it doesn't do much and they quickly lost interest. But my babies do love their baby jail.
Bassinet: Most playards include a bassinet, which is a convenient option if you’re going to have your baby sleep in it while using it as a travelling nursery. The bassinets in playards differ; some are full-sized and run down the length of the playard, some have options like a canopy which is great if you’re going to be using it outdoors, and some have a rocking motion.
Had no clue about this policy with Delta. The fine print isn’t exactly clear, so I’m guessing your miles may vary depending on your gate agent and airport. I am going to have to investigate the other airlines (somehow I’m guessing they aren’t as generous). Of course – don’t forget Southwest’s 2 free bags that make this all a non-issue if you choose to fly Southwest.
Truth is, the parenting culture has had mixed feelings about the playpen seemingly since it was invented. An ad in a 1925 newspaper, for example, for a device called the “Kiddie Koop” (reputedly designed by Buckminster Fuller), encapsulated the tension: “There is no thrill like that of holding and caring for a baby in your arms,” it began. “Yet the modern mother with her manifold duties must—simply MUST—forego such maternal joys at times, or the ‘regulation of household affairs’ will suffer.” Playpens would continue to be debated, not in the pages of scientific journals but in the mothering advice columns of newspapers. In a 1943 edition of the Spokane Daily Herald, Myrtle Meyer Eldred touted the benefits of playpens: “Not only is the child free of possible physical injury but his behavior is not subjected to constant punishment, since what he does in his guarded play-place does not annoy the parent.” In a 1957 article in the Chicago Tribune, the writer, after first asking the reader to remember “the great hue and cry raised against the play pen a few years back,” then goes on to cite a report by Dr. E. Robbins Kimball noting various advantages of the playpen (including the fact that it “gives nervous mothers relief.”) In 1966, a columnist was asked in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette if mothers used playpens “as a lazy excuse to keep their babies out of the way”; while in an article in that same paper a decade later, a reader of the “Parents Ask” column wondered about “some psychologists who are against playpens.” The column’s author, Louis B. Ames, noted the reader was probably referring to Burton White’s The First Three Years of Life (“there is no way of keeping most children from being bored in a playpen for longer than a very brief period of time”), and then went on to advise that “the ordinarily lively and intelligent baby does not have be entertained by others during all his waking hours.”
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This thing is great. I have it set up as a wall spliting my living room in half basically. The panels are sturdy so hold up great when my daughter pulls herself up standing against them. As i have it set up as a wall i did anchor it to the room walls byattaching some Velcro to the room wall with a screw at either end then wrapping the Velcro around a piece of each end section. This has allowed me to create a baby safe area with all her toys and then an adult safe area with no toys to trip over, and itlet meget away with not baby proofing the entertainment center.
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