To avoid potentially fatal entrapment between the station and the yard's top rail, never put your baby in a play yard that has the changing table in place. Removing the table also eliminates the possibility of entrapment by any loop from the changing-table restraint strap, although no loops should be present in a play yard that is said to meet safety standards set by ASTM International.
Only had a little while, but really not worth the money. Very flimsy can’t even lean against it when sitting in it. I bought it so I could let my son play while I did things near by; however I can not leave him unattended bc the way it’s made has perfect slots for them to be able to put feet in and climb up. Material is hollow plastic so it squishes also if pressed hard.
The Cosco Funsport Play Yard is a very affordable playpen option for babies that is simple to set up; the instructions say it takes less than a minute. This playpen comes equipped with wheels on one side to easily move it from room to room, and it also folds up easily and comes with a bag for transport. This playpen doesn’t come with a mattress; instead it has a lightly padded bottom piece for baby to play on. Some consumers have reported issues with the platform not resting flat on the bottom of the playpen. There are a few reports of confusion over how to fold the playpen up. (See the video below for a quick tutorial and some tips to make it easier!) Finally, make sure you order this playpen with plenty of lead time, as it is not eligible for Prime shipping and takes one to two months to ship out.
We have our 9 month old grandbaby visiting, and needed a secure place for him to play. This play area gives him room to play without him feeling confined, and I love the handles on top of each section, as he is pulling up and doing his best to walk while hanging on. We also purchased interlocking floor pieces to go in the floor, making this a clean,fun, safe,and colorful place for baby to play. Love it!
You need to get dinner on the table, but your baby's in her playpen, wailing like a banshee. All her favorite toys are inside the walls of the jungle-themed hexagon you bought at Babies 'R Us, but those toys are dead to her. She wants out, and she wants out now. You're probably wondering, why does my baby hate their playpen? As noted in Slate, the playpen debate is endless, but this is a no-judgment zone. Dinner's got to get done somehow.
ATTENTION moms, grandparents, babysitters... I bought this for my one year old grandson, actually 2, 1 for my house and 1 for my daughter's house. She told me a week or so ago that he'd removed one of the suction cups (there are 2 on the bottom of each panel), I thought it must have been a fluke, but I'm either in there with him or very close by, didn't think it would happen again. Just tonight, while I was maybe 5 feet away, watching him play, he somehow got a suction cup off one of the panels and into his mouth. This could have been a tragedy!

Even those who embraced the playpen, however, did so somewhat reluctantly (“a necessary evil,” ran one headline), and when I reached for the parenting bookshelf, it seemed the anti-playpen voices began to dominate. In Your Baby and Child by Penelope Leach, I was told that “babies who spend hours confined in cribs or playpens, with few toys and minimal adult attention, are very slow in learning to reach out and get hold of things and that means they are also slow in discovering what can be done with things.” In a book called Smart-Wiring Your Baby’s Brain, we are advised to “minimize the time she is confined to a crib or a playpen during waking hours.” Mavis Klein, in The Psychodynamic Counseling Primer, writes that “it has actually been shown that children of about seven or eight years of age who were, as infants, regularly confined in playpens, are less competent at reading and writing than those who were not so imprisoned”; while John Rosemond’s New Parent Power! warns that “there is evidence suggesting that children who spend lots of time confined in cribs or playpens suffered delayed speed and are less coordinated.”

It is a play yard that is made for the various developmental stages of a baby. This means you can use this playard for three subsequent life phases of your baby’s life viz. newborn stage, infant stage, and toddler stage. This is quite evident by the features of the playard. The small napper works great for young babies while the bigger bassinet is made for older infants. The diaper changer snaps out easily, which means you can remove it when it is not being used. You can attach the changer to the side of the play yard, which takes away your worry of having to store it.


I ordered this for my 8 month old daughter who is starting pull herself up. Compared to the rest of the playpens out there (and I've researched alot!), this was the best bang for my buck. It is sturdy enough that it gives my daughter enough support to hang onto (with supervision of course). It is easy to clean. The height is comparable to bending over a pack 'n play to put your child in if that helps give you an idea of what its like. There is enough room in there for 2 adults and a baby to sit comfortably. It keeps me sane when I have to do chores around the house, but have to keep the baby safe and contained in one area. The slats are small enough to where my dogs are not able to get through and bother her. I did have some issues with some missing parts, but this was taken care of and replaced by customer service. The package altogether was lighter than I expected. It is possible to travel with but it is bulky. Easy to take apart, and put back together. Extremely happy with my purchase, and their costumer service!
The word, on the face of it, is rather contradictory, combining play—a word with inherent jouissance—with a suffix that suggests confinement. Given that even pens for livestock have fallen under scrutiny—battery cages for chickens, for example, are critiqued because in them, hens “endure high levels of stress and frustration”—it’s not surprising to find parental discomfort with a product that seems so, well, penitential. Of course, the word yard itself has prison overtones, and when examining a product like the “North States Superyard XT Gate Play Yard” it’s not hard to get some serious Gitmo vibes. (Such misgivings about the playpen are exemplified in sculptor Robert Gober’s X Playpen, a bifurcated enclosure that, as one critic put it, “emphasizes this domestic space’s claustrotraumatic quality.”)
The reversible napper and changer is a great way to save a bit of space and even money. All you need to do is turn the napper by 360 degrees and it turns into a changer. There is a secure switch that can be only controlled by an adult, which facilitates this movement. There is also a toy bar, which is also completely detachable, to hang your baby’s toys.
Some basic models may be easier to cart around because they don't have any extra parts. You can also look for bags that leave the play yard's wheels free, so the whole thing can be rolled once it's packed up. If you plan on taking frequent trips (especially by air), you might want to consider a heavy-duty bag that you can buy separately, such as the Rover Gear Easton Travel Yard Bag (about $34).
I love this pen. It's bright, bulky enough so it's sturdy, but not extremely heavy so it's not hard to handle. Easy to put together and take apart. I bought 2 sets to make this pen twice as large. There is so much space to play and I still have so much room for more toys. I actually need more toys for it! I also love the handle on each gate. It allows me to hang crib toys and dangly toys from it. No toxic odors. Only thing I wasn't happy about was that 2 of the plastic feet to hold up the gate, came damaged. It wasn't packaged right, these 2 feet were cracked right down the middle so I took off a star. Also, the activity panel is pretty boring for my 1 and 2 year old. They found it interesting the first couple if days But it doesn't do much and they quickly lost interest. But my babies do love their baby jail.
If your play yard is going to function mostly as a play space for your baby, or you're on a tight budget, you can probably go with a basic model and skip the accessories such as mobiles and bassinet insert. A pair of lockable wheels or swivel casters on one end of the yard will make it easier to move from room to room. If you'll use it for travel, you'll want a play yard that's lightweight, folds quickly and compactly, and has a carrying case. You may even want to be able to roll the packed unit. A carrying bag that allows the play yard's wheels to roll when it's packed is ideal.

LOVE this as much as I thought I would!!! I use them to close my baby in or give her freedom while blocking her from other rooms. Have even just used 2 to block her from getting out of a room while I’m doing stuff. For me it’s common sense but as for the suction cups at the bottom, they work best when you clean them and the surface you’re going to stick it to. I haven’t even needed to use all of the panels all together yet but I know I will eventually.
Pretty good. Fits into lots of our gear - glider, pack and play, rock and play. (I found a portable mobile to be better for the glider bc the span is a bit wide for this but I could have made do with this.) think that adds a little more life to these things. The rings allow you to add other toys. I do this a lot when I put on the pack and play bc mine is a cheaper model that doesn’t have the bassinet feature so little man is just all the way down in there. The hanging toys that come with it are ok. Baby doesn’t seem too interested but they are cute. The middle piece keeps falling which is annoying. Price is fair.
We were dissappointed with this product. We dissagree with previous review about the easy setup. The set we received had bad fit. Some of the hinge holes are smaller than the hinge, and some of the hinge holes were too big so there was a problem with the fit. The panels with the hinge holes that are too big for the hinges comes apart easily and it's unsafe for our 12 mos old to hold against the panel. Also the door hardware came apart after just a few uses. Lastly, the suction cups is a hazard. Our baby was able to remove one of the suction cup and play with it.
I have had this playpen set up for couple weeks. And my 7-months old baby girl loves having her alone time in it away from our two crazy puppies. Even my 8-year old daughter and 9-year old son love to spend some special time with their baby sister in there. And the most fun part was on the day when we set the playpen up, my 8-year old daughter gathered all the baby toys she saw all around the house, and arranged them nicely in the playpen, and she even took a nap(or pretended she did) with the baby in it. Lol.... Must be the girl thing;)
The pieces were super easy to assemble. Just slide the rods on one piece into the holes on the next piece to connect them. I was a little disappointed that the rods/holes were not hexagonal like the instructions state. That would have locked them into position either straight or at an angle. Instead, the rods/holes are round, so the panels move around (accordion style) and won't stay in a straight line. There are suction cups on the bottom of the panels that might help if you're using it on a hard floor or smooth mat, but they're useless on carpet or textured mat.

This is a great little Baby cage 😉 I mean playpen lol it work perfect to put my almost 2 year old in while I do the things I need so I know she's not getting into crap she knows she shouldn't be touching or climbing on the table and suprisingly she loves it I set it up a bit different to make it bigger but it's like her own little spot with all her toys I am so happy with this purchase the slip on pieces to keep each section straight are great to I wouldn't want one without them it would be a total mess! Excellent quality and affordable price! And much better than those cheap round plastic ones that kids can just push over!
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