This sleek, Dutch-designed playard will fit right into a modern home. It’s one-hand folding system makes for an easy setup, especially since the upper cot folds with the frame. The cushy quilted mattress turns the playard into a bassinet for your baby and then later into a dreamy napping spot for your toddler. And it comes in grown-up colors, too: red, black, gray, navy and khaki.
Some play yards feature a mobile with suspended toys or a detachable baby gym that can also be used with the bassinet mattress on the floor as a separate play mat for tummy time. These are a bonus, as are entertainment centers with music, soothing sounds, and lights. But all will contribute to the price and weight of the yard, and will make it more difficult to pack up the play yard for storage or travel. They usually require C or AA batteries (not included). Toys may not be necessary if you intend to use your play yard as just a portable nursery. But if you use a play yard as a mobile activity center, toys and sound effects can be helpful.
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You need to get dinner on the table, but your baby's in her playpen, wailing like a banshee. All her favorite toys are inside the walls of the jungle-themed hexagon you bought at Babies 'R Us, but those toys are dead to her. She wants out, and she wants out now. You're probably wondering, why does my baby hate their playpen? As noted in Slate, the playpen debate is endless, but this is a no-judgment zone. Dinner's got to get done somehow.
I received all 8 panels as promised in the description from this seller (I noticed some people said they didn't). High quality (he doesn't hurt his mouth of this when he tries to chew on it), it's smooth and easy to assemble. Even if he bangs his head against one of the gates, he isn't screaming as if it was wood - we still watch him in this because he's not old enough to not watch him but he easily moves around without problems. Colors are great, gate works really well, and its a perfect size for us - gives our 9 month old Baby enough room to play with different items but is not so huge its cumbersome in our place. Suction cups work well too (we have wood floors) and even with the ABC mat underneath, there are points where we can still suction it to the floor so it continues to not move. Overall, its awesome.
I can’t honestly say I remember physically being in a playpen as a child—though I was—but I remember them as a fact of 1970s child life, a rubber-and-mesh piece of living room furniture as ubiquitous as mahogany-cabinet-enclosed Magnavox televisions (with family photos crowded out by a giant Betamax on top). But as the clock ticked toward my recent entry into fatherhood and I trawled various hip and modern baby-product sites, mentally equipping our nursery-to-be, I noticed that among all the titanium-framed Norwegian strollers and German educational toys (or was it vice-versa?), I didn’t seem to see any playpens —whether rendered in sustainably sourced wenge wood or not. The word didn’t really seem to surface very much among all the proper parenting discourse on the chat sites either. Which left me wondering: Do parents still use playpens? Or are they some relic of me-decade indulgence forsaken in an era of more enlightened child-rearing?
While you don’t need a playard - an activity mat can entertain a pre-crawler and a childproof area enclosed by baby gates can rein in a toddler - playards do offer a bevy of benefits. Depending on what model you choose, playards can double as a diaper changing station (especially great if your home has multiple stories!), a bassinet, a portable crib and a worry-free play spot. Of course, bouncers and swings are great worry-free play spots as well, but playards offer a bit more freedom of motion. Playards are definitely great for day trips to grandma’s house, where uncovered electrical outlets and delicate knick knacks could be within your toddler’s reach, and for overnight vacations, since your little one can use it as both a playspace and a portable crib.
Play-yard frames are typically made of metal tubing. Mesh on three or, better yet, all four sides provides ventilation and allows you to see your baby. Most models have hinges and lock buttons in the center of the top rails. To set up a play yard, you'll need to pull the top rails up so that they're locked, then push the floor down and secure the play yard mattress or pad. To fold this design, you'll need to pull the floor up, and then raise the top rails slightly while pressing the release buttons to unlatch and collapse the top rails. Before assembling or using your play yard, read the owner's manual carefully and keep it handy for future reference.
It's easy to put together and take a part. The stickers were hard to place but that's not a big deal to me. My son, now almost 10 months, hates being confined. The play pen was very sturdy but he wouldn't stay in there without crying. I ended up buying another one and using sections of the pen to block off areas of the house. It's not as sturdy when not put together in a closed shape, but it works for us.
As these books tend to be short on footnotes, I couldn’t actually track down any such study. And what a study it would have to be: large-scale, “longitudinal,” intensely observational, randomized. Otherwise, how would we really know how much time children had spent in playpens (self-reports tend to be biased), what sort of households the children lived in, not to mention what might have occurred in the years between the time spent in playpens and the time of the reading and writing tests at age 7 or 8? Which left me wondering: Is the fear of playpens all hype? Just a hysterical outcropping of our anxious style of modern parenting?
If a quick DIY play yard better suits your requirement then make one at home with an inflatable plastic kiddy pool. In case you have a kid’s plastic pool lying around in your house, then you can inflate it and convert into a play yard. Simply inflate the plastic frame, place a soft blanket or mattress inside it, and you just made a safe and comfortable place for your baby to play. Just make sure the walls of the pool are high enough to prevent your baby from crawling out. Also keep all sharp and pointy things away from the pool.
No matter whether you would prefer to call them baby play yard or playpen, these are an essential accessory for any home with a baby. These are portable structures that allow the babies to play in a secure environment. Though if you have been careful, there are some slight differences between play yards and play pens for babies. But they play an equal role. They are great for indoor and outdoor ensuring that a baby doesn’t constrain your freedom of movement. What we do is evaluate the features of different brands and models to ensure you buy the best. In this case, we showcase the top 10 best baby playpens in 2018 reviews.
Whatever its name, the concept of the playpen reveals yet another fault line in the politics of anxious parenting, as I found via a simple inquiry—whether the playpen was in or out of vogue—at Urbanbaby.com, a site that combines the neurotic firepower of Woody Allen’s 1970s oeuvre with the conviviality-tinged-with-hostility of the Mos Eisley cantina in Star Wars. Reading through the various replies (including a few from parents-to-be who shared my curiosity), the opinions seemed to fall roughly into two camps: Against were those who said playpens are overly confining, that it is better to child-proof one’s home instead, that playpens are “the first compromise to good parenting” (inevitably followed by television, etc.); on the other side were those who averred that playpens are safe and necessary spaces to park toddlers while getting things done, that it is folly to suggest that one’s parental eyes can always be trained on the child, that far from restricting creativity playpens enhance a sense of independence, etc.
The quality is certainly there. The mesh seems very strong and its very easy to collapse and put away. The same goes for putting it together. It just folds in or out. The reason for not giving it 4 stars is the padding on the floor. We had to put additional patting as its too hard. So keep that in mind when buying this play pen. I would recommend for its portability and the zipper at front.
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