The Cosco Funsport Play Yard is a very affordable playpen option for babies that is simple to set up; the instructions say it takes less than a minute. This playpen comes equipped with wheels on one side to easily move it from room to room, and it also folds up easily and comes with a bag for transport. This playpen doesn’t come with a mattress; instead it has a lightly padded bottom piece for baby to play on. Some consumers have reported issues with the platform not resting flat on the bottom of the playpen. There are a few reports of confusion over how to fold the playpen up. (See the video below for a quick tutorial and some tips to make it easier!) Finally, make sure you order this playpen with plenty of lead time, as it is not eligible for Prime shipping and takes one to two months to ship out.
The word, on the face of it, is rather contradictory, combining play—a word with inherent jouissance—with a suffix that suggests confinement. Given that even pens for livestock have fallen under scrutiny—battery cages for chickens, for example, are critiqued because in them, hens “endure high levels of stress and frustration”—it’s not surprising to find parental discomfort with a product that seems so, well, penitential. Of course, the word yard itself has prison overtones, and when examining a product like the “North States Superyard XT Gate Play Yard” it’s not hard to get some serious Gitmo vibes. (Such misgivings about the playpen are exemplified in sculptor Robert Gober’s X Playpen, a bifurcated enclosure that, as one critic put it, “emphasizes this domestic space’s claustrotraumatic quality.”)

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My wife and I bought this play yard for our son because it is the nicest we've seen on the market for the money. This isn't a pet yard, so your child won't look like an animal inside it. It actually has some educational value with the primary colors, so you can start to teach your child the colors upon arrival, then move on to what's inside. You should know, however, that if you want to make it into a square shape with the rounded corners as shown in some of the product images, you need to buy those corner pieces separately. Someone else reviewed this play yard and discovered the same thing when they opened the box. It's one of those things where you open it up and go..."Oh...so it doesn't come with the rounded corner pieces as shown in the photo? You have to buy those separately??!! The manufacturer needs to be clear in the ad description regarding what pieces are included. What you CAN do with what's in the box is make it an 8 panel, 6 panel, or L shape play yard if you wish, without buying additional pieces. Thanks for reading and I hope you find this review helpful.
• Remove mobiles and toy bars when your child can roll over or push up on hands and knees so he can't reach them and pull them down, due to the hazard of strangulation. If your child uses a play yard at a day-care center or someone else's home, be sure it's a recent model, preferably manufactured in 2008 or later. Also check its condition as your would any item your child might use. Visit Consumer Product Safety Commission to make sure that model has never been recalled.
Very pleased. I have a big baby boy and I was unsure of the stability before i purchased this. He's now 14m old, 31 inches tall and 35 pounds. He does fine with it. We've had it for a few months now and we love it. Very sturdy. I read that the stickers were easily peeled off and could become a choking hazard, so I simply never applied them. Easy to assemble. It sits in a circle or square/rectangle with no extra pieces or panels. I also read mixed reviews on the suction cups for securing to non carpet floor. We have faux wood laminate and I never bothered putting them on. Still, no problems. I'm a big time reviewer before purchasing. I can tell ya...this is a great buy.
My son and I found this playpen to be very enjoyable. The set up was very easy and was done in several minutes. The sides slid into one another. My almost 2 year old son was not able to get the sides apart and break out. The plastic sides were good quality. They were thick enough plastic without being overly heavy. There is a door with a lock. My son was unable to get out of the door when he tried. When I opened the door to let him out, he wanted to get his sister or me and bring us into the play pen. There is a basketball hoop in the playpen that you screw on by a twist of a cap. It is on pretty sturdy although the hoop itself is bendable. This was a very enjoyable ... full review
 Yes you may have loose pieces you have to watch out. If you are not using bare flat floor you better take the sucking cups out and have your kid in sight if he is the kid that gets all in mouth. Yes I had to get more than a couple of times the arms out of a jam. It tend to happen just at a certain time when their arms are just the size to get in between but they out grow that phase rather quick. I give them 5 stars. Because it does the job! My kids could not been more safe out of it! I never get them loose around the house and so I avoided all kids of dangerous situations with doors, windows, chemicals that look like candy and the sort. I have 5 kids, when I thought we were done with kids, (3) we gave the panels away. That is how much they last. We had to buy it again with child number 4. We moved back and forth because of my husband type of job and as many times we moved this play pen acomodated EVERYWHERE! And different forms sometimes just like a big wall. The old company who had the rights for the design had music built in, I liked it but was annoying to most parents so they got rid of it. very little things in life can be just perfect, the closest is the jumperoo so far but this one has been a life saver for a longer time. I do recommend it, just be watchful. I read people having problems with the bear decal so I post a video with my husband putting one. I hope it helps
I absolutely love this! It's great for uses outdoors with a baby boy who likes to eat grass and dirt! Keeps him in one area and off of the grass with a blanket placed under it! :) it's also AWESOME for indoors when you're trying to clean, take a quick shower or keep the baby away from the things they aren't supposed to have! My son loves it because he can stand up while holding the panels and walk all around it! Just a heads up for new buyers and possibly old THE PANELS DO CLICK TOGETHER. I did not know they did but just pull up on them and they snap right together! I found this out on accident :) it was the only issue I had with it and well... it's no longer an issue!
So, playpen, childproof room, fully free range, or something else? Are playpens cages of disregard or safe, useful accoutrements? How much time is too much time? Will a playpen keep my daughter out of the Ivy League? When I asked Alison Gopnik, professor of psychology at University of California-Berkeley and author of the just-released book The Philosophical Baby, about any work on the negative consequences of playpens, her answer was instructive: “I don’t know of any systematic research on this,” she noted, adding, “Ironically these small kinds of parenting differences, which are just the things parents care about most, are just the areas where scientists wouldn’t expect to see many differences.”

This playpen was exactly what we needed! We purchased it 2 months ago when our 10 month old was becoming very mobile, and it has become a great play area where I know we can leave her while we do things around the house and not have to worry. The colors are SO much nicer than many of these on the market. It's really cheerful and the quality is good. I do wish the suction cups worked better on our hardwood floors - when i first placed it down it stuck nicely, but then I rearranged them and they no longer stick well. I put foam puzzle tiles inside and trimmed them to fit within the perimeter of the playpen walls. Happy baby and happy parents :)
Determine what you want most out of a playard before adding one to your registry. If you plan on needing it for travel - whether day trips or weekenders - you’ll want to look for one that is lightweight and easy to fold up. If you’d prefer to use a playard as a bassinet and diaper changing station too, look for souped up models that are not only practical but attractive too (you’ll be looking at it for a few years!).
As these books tend to be short on footnotes, I couldn’t actually track down any such study. And what a study it would have to be: large-scale, “longitudinal,” intensely observational, randomized. Otherwise, how would we really know how much time children had spent in playpens (self-reports tend to be biased), what sort of households the children lived in, not to mention what might have occurred in the years between the time spent in playpens and the time of the reading and writing tests at age 7 or 8? Which left me wondering: Is the fear of playpens all hype? Just a hysterical outcropping of our anxious style of modern parenting?
Many play yards, such as the Graco Silhouette discussed in Types, offer a bassinet that covers the entire length and width of the play yard. That is a good feature because it reduces the likelihood that your baby will fall into the play yard. But a baby could still fall outside of the play yard so stop using any bassinet attachment once your baby can push up on his hands and knees. The Safety 1st Travel Ease Elite Play Yard (about $112) also comes with this type of bassinet, and a changing table and removable toy bar. It measures 30 x 46 1/4 inches and has lockable wheels.

You need to get dinner on the table, but your baby's in her playpen, wailing like a banshee. All her favorite toys are inside the walls of the jungle-themed hexagon you bought at Babies 'R Us, but those toys are dead to her. She wants out, and she wants out now. You're probably wondering, why does my baby hate their playpen? As noted in Slate, the playpen debate is endless, but this is a no-judgment zone. Dinner's got to get done somehow.
Many parents will find it hard to control the ambitions of the kids who are introducing themselves to walking. However, with Costzon 8 Panel Baby Playpen in hand, you will easily get you kid held more safely. It features a polyethylene material which is safe and non-toxic and always stable. It has a secure locking system with an additional lock which will keep your kid in the playpen. Besides it features a spinning ball and wall pictures, and an addition of a playing phone which will hold the attraction of your little kid and will, therefore, enjoy playing alone in the playpen.
Roll with it. Some manufacturers claim that their play yards fold compactly and easily, which is especially important if you'll be traveling with it or assembling and disassembling it often. See for yourself how easy it is by practicing on floor models in the store before you buy. Some parents find that while they can collapse their play yard in a jiffy, fitting the whole thing into its travel bag is almost impossible. If traveling with the play yard is important to you, look at the travel bags when you are shopping.
I had been using the colorful 8-panel North States baby gate from the time by babies were 6 months-one year. But once they were learning to climb the gate with their toes in the little holes (and use their baby muscles to pull the entire gate down), I knew it was time for a more sturdy option. This fit the ticket, it's not as large as the North States - but plenty large enough for toddler twins (with more than enough room for mom and/or dad to play in with them as well). It's also a few inches shorter in height to our old play pen, but it's not an issue with our 28 & 29 inch boys because the openings/holes on the play pen are low enough that when they step on them, it's more than tall enough to make them unable to climb over. ... full review
Pretty good. Fits into lots of our gear - glider, pack and play, rock and play. (I found a portable mobile to be better for the glider bc the span is a bit wide for this but I could have made do with this.) think that adds a little more life to these things. The rings allow you to add other toys. I do this a lot when I put on the pack and play bc mine is a cheaper model that doesn’t have the bassinet feature so little man is just all the way down in there. The hanging toys that come with it are ok. Baby doesn’t seem too interested but they are cute. The middle piece keeps falling which is annoying. Price is fair.
Great quality. I can sit next to this pin/mat without worrying about her falling knocking her head. (we are moving into our new, which is why I move the pin in front of the television. Not usual spot, before I get attacked for child endangerment. lol the television is also attached to wall.) Just wanted to share for those pending about purchasing this pin, it's great. I purchased 2, but didn't add all the panels. I also didn't add the teddy bear sticker, she would definitely peel and try to eat them.
“My baby slept in this from three to six months of age in our room after he outgrew the bassinet. We’ve also taken it along in our suitcase on two trips and he has no problem falling asleep despite being in a new environment. Now that he’s on the move, I use it to contain him so I can pee without worrying he’s going to assault the cat.” -Starlee R.

The play yard clips to the frame at the bottom, which means there is no risk of the fabric moving from its place even if your baby shifts and moves a lot inside it. This is a lightweight play yard thus making it very easy to carry for your next long trip with your little one. The presence of pockets to store your baby’s diapers and wipes helps save space, and makes space for more important items readily available.
I can’t honestly say I remember physically being in a playpen as a child—though I was—but I remember them as a fact of 1970s child life, a rubber-and-mesh piece of living room furniture as ubiquitous as mahogany-cabinet-enclosed Magnavox televisions (with family photos crowded out by a giant Betamax on top). But as the clock ticked toward my recent entry into fatherhood and I trawled various hip and modern baby-product sites, mentally equipping our nursery-to-be, I noticed that among all the titanium-framed Norwegian strollers and German educational toys (or was it vice-versa?), I didn’t seem to see any playpens —whether rendered in sustainably sourced wenge wood or not. The word didn’t really seem to surface very much among all the proper parenting discourse on the chat sites either. Which left me wondering: Do parents still use playpens? Or are they some relic of me-decade indulgence forsaken in an era of more enlightened child-rearing?
Truth is, the parenting culture has had mixed feelings about the playpen seemingly since it was invented. An ad in a 1925 newspaper, for example, for a device called the “Kiddie Koop” (reputedly designed by Buckminster Fuller), encapsulated the tension: “There is no thrill like that of holding and caring for a baby in your arms,” it began. “Yet the modern mother with her manifold duties must—simply MUST—forego such maternal joys at times, or the ‘regulation of household affairs’ will suffer.” Playpens would continue to be debated, not in the pages of scientific journals but in the mothering advice columns of newspapers. In a 1943 edition of the Spokane Daily Herald, Myrtle Meyer Eldred touted the benefits of playpens: “Not only is the child free of possible physical injury but his behavior is not subjected to constant punishment, since what he does in his guarded play-place does not annoy the parent.” In a 1957 article in the Chicago Tribune, the writer, after first asking the reader to remember “the great hue and cry raised against the play pen a few years back,” then goes on to cite a report by Dr. E. Robbins Kimball noting various advantages of the playpen (including the fact that it “gives nervous mothers relief.”) In 1966, a columnist was asked in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette if mothers used playpens “as a lazy excuse to keep their babies out of the way”; while in an article in that same paper a decade later, a reader of the “Parents Ask” column wondered about “some psychologists who are against playpens.” The column’s author, Louis B. Ames, noted the reader was probably referring to Burton White’s The First Three Years of Life (“there is no way of keeping most children from being bored in a playpen for longer than a very brief period of time”), and then went on to advise that “the ordinarily lively and intelligent baby does not have be entertained by others during all his waking hours.”

Many parents feel that a playpen is a best and convenient way to allow their baby to play in one place where they are safe and also the parents can keep an eye on them while attending other chores at home. Currently, you can find various types of playpens and they can be folded easily and place it in any room. It is also useful when you want to leave your baby unsupervised for short time like when you have to take bath, etc. Also, some consider that it is a suitable place for an irregular nap but don’t make it a regular place for a nap.
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