Ben is one energetic crawler, who is making his first crawling attempts around the house. He crawls over anything and everything that lies in his path. This invariably left Ben’s mom quite perturbed and nervous: – what if he dangles into a wire? Then one day she heard of play yards, also called playpens. You can safely place your baby in a foldable play yard and not worry about his crawling into something dangerous. Now that seems neat but how do you select one?
If your play yard is going to function mostly as a play space for your baby, or you're on a tight budget, you can probably go with a basic model and skip the accessories such as mobiles and bassinet insert. A pair of lockable wheels or swivel casters on one end of the yard will make it easier to move from room to room. If you'll use it for travel, you'll want a play yard that's lightweight, folds quickly and compactly, and has a carrying case. You may even want to be able to roll the packed unit. A carrying bag that allows the play yard's wheels to roll when it's packed is ideal.
We have our 9 month old grandbaby visiting, and needed a secure place for him to play. This play area gives him room to play without him feeling confined, and I love the handles on top of each section, as he is pulling up and doing his best to walk while hanging on. We also purchased interlocking floor pieces to go in the floor, making this a clean,fun, safe,and colorful place for baby to play. Love it!
So, playpen, childproof room, fully free range, or something else? Are playpens cages of disregard or safe, useful accoutrements? How much time is too much time? Will a playpen keep my daughter out of the Ivy League? When I asked Alison Gopnik, professor of psychology at University of California-Berkeley and author of the just-released book The Philosophical Baby, about any work on the negative consequences of playpens, her answer was instructive: “I don’t know of any systematic research on this,” she noted, adding, “Ironically these small kinds of parenting differences, which are just the things parents care about most, are just the areas where scientists wouldn’t expect to see many differences.”
I can’t honestly say I remember physically being in a playpen as a child—though I was—but I remember them as a fact of 1970s child life, a rubber-and-mesh piece of living room furniture as ubiquitous as mahogany-cabinet-enclosed Magnavox televisions (with family photos crowded out by a giant Betamax on top). But as the clock ticked toward my recent entry into fatherhood and I trawled various hip and modern baby-product sites, mentally equipping our nursery-to-be, I noticed that among all the titanium-framed Norwegian strollers and German educational toys (or was it vice-versa?), I didn’t seem to see any playpens —whether rendered in sustainably sourced wenge wood or not. The word didn’t really seem to surface very much among all the proper parenting discourse on the chat sites either. Which left me wondering: Do parents still use playpens? Or are they some relic of me-decade indulgence forsaken in an era of more enlightened child-rearing?
This playpen was exactly what we needed! We purchased it 2 months ago when our 10 month old was becoming very mobile, and it has become a great play area where I know we can leave her while we do things around the house and not have to worry. The colors are SO much nicer than many of these on the market. It's really cheerful and the quality is good. I do wish the suction cups worked better on our hardwood floors - when i first placed it down it stuck nicely, but then I rearranged them and they no longer stick well. I put foam puzzle tiles inside and trimmed them to fit within the perimeter of the playpen walls. Happy baby and happy parents :)
Kidzone brand new 8 panel child's play-pen. This play-pen features ball spinners, telephone, and a swinging hinged door with safety lock. The size of this playpen can increase or decrease by removing or adding panels. Includes rubber suction cups to secure playpen to floor on flat/hard surfaces. It also may create interest and encourage mobility for your child. Makes a great holiday gift.
At the higher end of the price spectrum, you'll see a lot of add-on features. For example, the Graco Silhouette Pack ‘n Play Playard with Bassinet and Changer, about $170, has a removable changing table (with an "organizer" to hold diapers, wipes, etc.) and a bassinet feature. The bassinet has a maximum weight capacity of 15 pounds and the changing table has a weight capacity of 25 pounds. This model also comes with a vibrating mattress, electronic mobile, canopy, console with music, and night light. The manufacturer says you should only use the play yard with children under 35 inches tall.

I have been satisfied with this playpen so far. It has a nice size for my baby to play in. Most of her small to medium sized toys, plus a fold up sponge sofa(where she takes her naps during daytime when being unfolded), can all fit in there. And there is still room for me , even for my hubby to squeeze in and interact with her. It helps me a lot during daytime specially with two dogs running around in the house all day long. At least I don't have to worry about my baby girl getting knocked over and hurt by the dogs. I wish I had fund this product when I had my first two kids nine years ago.
The baby trend deluxe nursery center comes with all the features that you expect from a modern play yard. The bassinet is removable and washable. The entire play yard fabric is held on a metal frame, which is attached to a pair of wheels for easy maneuvering. The wheels can be locked to a position for safety. There is also an electronic module to play different sounds and melodies to soothe the baby.

The quality is certainly there. The mesh seems very strong and its very easy to collapse and put away. The same goes for putting it together. It just folds in or out. The reason for not giving it 4 stars is the padding on the floor. We had to put additional patting as its too hard. So keep that in mind when buying this play pen. I would recommend for its portability and the zipper at front.
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