If you expect to frequently move your play yard from room to room, check its dimensions before you buy. Many interior doorways are only 30 inches wide—no problem for the 28-inch width of most basic models. But many deluxe models are wider—the Graco mentioned above, for example, would be a tight squeeze at 28.8 inches wide. Just be aware that you might find yourself folding a deluxe model to move it around inside the house.
I have one that I've had for a year with zero issues and an extremely rough toddler. I have tried other gates and fences that were cheaper but just ordered two more of these because nothing compares to the sturdy quality and height of this one. I use it to fence off our computer area, to make him a safe place near our pool and another now around our entertainment center. I don't know what I would do without the versatility of this product.
Some basic models may be easier to cart around because they don't have any extra parts. You can also look for bags that leave the play yard's wheels free, so the whole thing can be rolled once it's packed up. If you plan on taking frequent trips (especially by air), you might want to consider a heavy-duty bag that you can buy separately, such as the Rover Gear Easton Travel Yard Bag (about $34).
The super-light playard folds up into a backpack case so your arms are still free to hold your little one and a diaper bag. Unlike the other playards in our top picks, this one features a zippered side door so you can lay down with your baby to nurse or cuddle him to sleep and then draw away once he’s in dreamland. The open side door also lets babies and toddlers go in and out of their special place, when you want them to, which makes the playard more like a play fort. Once you get the hang of it, the Lotus Everywhere Crib sets up in 15 seconds and the extra-long mattress lays flat on the floor.
Now, a simple visit to a site like Babies ‘R’ Us will confirm that, yes, playpens do still exist. But they seem to have been rebranded, for these devices are no longer called playpens. Instead, searching for the term on Babies ‘R’ Us will yield a range of “Pack n’ Plays” (a trademark of the kid-product manufacturer Graco, and which purists insist is less a playpen in the traditional sense than a traveling crib), and various takes on the “playard” (a word that seems vaguely French but is actually a contraction of “Play Yard”). Rather tellingly, a Google search for playpen seems to yield as many entries for contraptions to corral  pets as children.
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My wife and I bought this play yard for our son because it is the nicest we've seen on the market for the money. This isn't a pet yard, so your child won't look like an animal inside it. It actually has some educational value with the primary colors, so you can start to teach your child the colors upon arrival, then move on to what's inside. You should know, however, that if you want to make it into a square shape with the rounded corners as shown in some of the product images, you need to buy those corner pieces separately. Someone else reviewed this play yard and discovered the same thing when they opened the box. It's one of those things where you open it up and go..."Oh...so it doesn't come with the rounded corner pieces as shown in the photo? You have to buy those separately??!! The manufacturer needs to be clear in the ad description regarding what pieces are included. What you CAN do with what's in the box is make it an 8 panel, 6 panel, or L shape play yard if you wish, without buying additional pieces. Thanks for reading and I hope you find this review helpful.

It's helped us out tremendously. It provides a way for us to cordon off a safe space for our son while allowing him an area to freely move. The fact that it breaks apart and can be arranged in various patterns allowed us to expand that space with some creative use of furniture. Sadly though like all young raptors, he's testing the gates, looking for weaknesses that he'll eventually use to escape and terrorize the local populace of cats.
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