This play area is great! It gives me some peace of mind when I can't be near my 9 month old son all the time, while doing house work. He loves it! I put a little couch in there and his toys. I even put a nice toddler mirror on the inside with gorilla tape and it's awesome! He is always laughing at himself. He can't pull it off. He's tried! Wonderful purchase! Good sturdy playpen!
I cannot stress this enough with regards to any type of baby equipment. The number one priority is that it should be safe! Be sure to read reviews from parents and experts and keep an eye on product recalls. I would strongly recommend never buying a used playpen or playard; baby items are recalled all the time, and you’re much better off getting a new model that is proven to be safe.
If you plan to have your little one sleep in your room or your baby has a smaller room you might want to try a pack 'n play that has a smaller footprint. This one acts as a bassinet when your baby is in the newborn stage but can convert to a mini crib when they get older. This model only holds up to 30 pounds but for some that can be well past the age of two. What's also great about this is it looks more like a permanent crib instead of something portable so if you plan to use this all the time it has more of a design aesthetic. 
A division of Dorel Juvenile Products, Safety 1st entered the juvenile market in 1984 with its now classic and internationally recognized "Baby on Board" sign. Fueled by the immediate success of the sign, the company claimed a market niche in child safety and became the first brand to develop a comprehensive line of "childproofing" products. Available everywhere juvenile products are sold, and online.
I received all 8 panels as promised in the description from this seller (I noticed some people said they didn't). High quality (he doesn't hurt his mouth of this when he tries to chew on it), it's smooth and easy to assemble. Even if he bangs his head against one of the gates, he isn't screaming as if it was wood - we still watch him in this because he's not old enough to not watch him but he easily moves around without problems. Colors are great, gate works really well, and its a perfect size for us - gives our 9 month old Baby enough room to play with different items but is not so huge its cumbersome in our place. Suction cups work well too (we have wood floors) and even with the ABC mat underneath, there are points where we can still suction it to the floor so it continues to not move. Overall, its awesome.

I ordered this for my 8 month old daughter who is starting pull herself up. Compared to the rest of the playpens out there (and I've researched alot!), this was the best bang for my buck. It is sturdy enough that it gives my daughter enough support to hang onto (with supervision of course). It is easy to clean. The height is comparable to bending over a pack 'n play to put your child in if that helps give you an idea of what its like. There is enough room in there for 2 adults and a baby to sit comfortably. It keeps me sane when I have to do chores around the house, but have to keep the baby safe and contained in one area. The slats are small enough to where my dogs are not able to get through and bother her. I did have some issues with some missing parts, but this was taken care of and replaced by customer service. The package altogether was lighter than I expected. It is possible to travel with but it is bulky. Easy to take apart, and put back together. Extremely happy with my purchase, and their costumer service!


Most manufacturers make play yards that are designed to move. Many roll on wheels and fold easily and compactly into their own totes, which resemble short golf bags (although less rugged), making them ideal for trips or jaunts to Grandma's. As we've said, basic play yards tend to be smaller (about 28 inches wide) and lighter (about 20 pounds) because they're not loaded with extras. If you can find a model that fits into its travel bag with its wheels exposed, it can make moving through a busy place such as an airport easier. The Chicco Lullaby LX mentioned above does that.
If a quick DIY play yard better suits your requirement then make one at home with an inflatable plastic kiddy pool. In case you have a kid’s plastic pool lying around in your house, then you can inflate it and convert into a play yard. Simply inflate the plastic frame, place a soft blanket or mattress inside it, and you just made a safe and comfortable place for your baby to play. Just make sure the walls of the pool are high enough to prevent your baby from crawling out. Also keep all sharp and pointy things away from the pool.

Some basic models may be easier to cart around because they don't have any extra parts. You can also look for bags that leave the play yard's wheels free, so the whole thing can be rolled once it's packed up. If you plan on taking frequent trips (especially by air), you might want to consider a heavy-duty bag that you can buy separately, such as the Rover Gear Easton Travel Yard Bag (about $34).

We live in a house filled with breakable art and treasures, so we bought a total of 5 sets, connecting all of them together to create a space within our great big museum of a house, virtually toddler proofing the ground floor but giving the grand kid the run of the place (sort of). These set up and break down quickly. Carpeting leaves some wiggle room but it's still quite functional. The topping pieces that secure the sections are not really necessary and could be improved by providing left angles in addition to the rights and straights. We just left them off and in that way we were able to construct odd angles. This really is the best choice among all on the market, in my opinion. I did my research....believe me....before spending nearly $600 on 5 sets. We did have one get lost by UPS but the seller eventually delivered the replacement. Overall: Totally Happy.


It is a play yard that is made for the various developmental stages of a baby. This means you can use this playard for three subsequent life phases of your baby’s life viz. newborn stage, infant stage, and toddler stage. This is quite evident by the features of the playard. The small napper works great for young babies while the bigger bassinet is made for older infants. The diaper changer snaps out easily, which means you can remove it when it is not being used. You can attach the changer to the side of the play yard, which takes away your worry of having to store it.
Bassinet: Most playards include a bassinet, which is a convenient option if you’re going to have your baby sleep in it while using it as a travelling nursery. The bassinets in playards differ; some are full-sized and run down the length of the playard, some have options like a canopy which is great if you’re going to be using it outdoors, and some have a rocking motion.
When your baby is a newborn putting them low to floor can cause major strain on your back so you'll want to shop for a playard that has two levels so you can have them higher when they are younger and then move them lower when they learn to roll over. This model from the popular Graco line does all of this at a reasonable price and has some added features like a mobile and pockets on the side to store, diaper, wipes and such. 

As you descend from 10 to 1, you’ll encounter different baby playpens that are worth the price. It is upon you to consider your capability, preference and other factors and decide which one is right for your baby. Of course, you’ll be willing to spend the last coin for the sake of your lovely baby’s safety and comfort. It seems Gupamiga Baby Playpen rocks all over the market. It is the number one best baby playpen in 2018.
Most manufacturers make play yards that are designed to move. Many roll on wheels and fold easily and compactly into their own totes, which resemble short golf bags (although less rugged), making them ideal for trips or jaunts to Grandma's. As we've said, basic play yards tend to be smaller (about 28 inches wide) and lighter (about 20 pounds) because they're not loaded with extras. If you can find a model that fits into its travel bag with its wheels exposed, it can make moving through a busy place such as an airport easier. The Chicco Lullaby LX mentioned above does that.
Pretty good. Fits into lots of our gear - glider, pack and play, rock and play. (I found a portable mobile to be better for the glider bc the span is a bit wide for this but I could have made do with this.) think that adds a little more life to these things. The rings allow you to add other toys. I do this a lot when I put on the pack and play bc mine is a cheaper model that doesn’t have the bassinet feature so little man is just all the way down in there. The hanging toys that come with it are ok. Baby doesn’t seem too interested but they are cute. The middle piece keeps falling which is annoying. Price is fair.
Truth is, the parenting culture has had mixed feelings about the playpen seemingly since it was invented. An ad in a 1925 newspaper, for example, for a device called the “Kiddie Koop” (reputedly designed by Buckminster Fuller), encapsulated the tension: “There is no thrill like that of holding and caring for a baby in your arms,” it began. “Yet the modern mother with her manifold duties must—simply MUST—forego such maternal joys at times, or the ‘regulation of household affairs’ will suffer.” Playpens would continue to be debated, not in the pages of scientific journals but in the mothering advice columns of newspapers. In a 1943 edition of the Spokane Daily Herald, Myrtle Meyer Eldred touted the benefits of playpens: “Not only is the child free of possible physical injury but his behavior is not subjected to constant punishment, since what he does in his guarded play-place does not annoy the parent.” In a 1957 article in the Chicago Tribune, the writer, after first asking the reader to remember “the great hue and cry raised against the play pen a few years back,” then goes on to cite a report by Dr. E. Robbins Kimball noting various advantages of the playpen (including the fact that it “gives nervous mothers relief.”) In 1966, a columnist was asked in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette if mothers used playpens “as a lazy excuse to keep their babies out of the way”; while in an article in that same paper a decade later, a reader of the “Parents Ask” column wondered about “some psychologists who are against playpens.” The column’s author, Louis B. Ames, noted the reader was probably referring to Burton White’s The First Three Years of Life (“there is no way of keeping most children from being bored in a playpen for longer than a very brief period of time”), and then went on to advise that “the ordinarily lively and intelligent baby does not have be entertained by others during all his waking hours.”
We purchased 4 sets of these to setup an outdoor play pen for our 1 1/2 year old triplets. Makes for a reasonably sized play area, and so far they haven't though to really try to scale them. Not really many places they could grab a foot hold which is nice. I love the flexibility of how they attach, makes it easy to arrange the space however you want. Very lightweight too, which makes for easy moving when we have the lawn mowed. Can just drag it out of the way.
This thing is great. I have it set up as a wall spliting my living room in half basically. The panels are sturdy so hold up great when my daughter pulls herself up standing against them. As i have it set up as a wall i did anchor it to the room walls byattaching some Velcro to the room wall with a screw at either end then wrapping the Velcro around a piece of each end section. This has allowed me to create a baby safe area with all her toys and then an adult safe area with no toys to trip over, and itlet meget away with not baby proofing the entertainment center.
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