I have been satisfied with this playpen so far. It has a nice size for my baby to play in. Most of her small to medium sized toys, plus a fold up sponge sofa(where she takes her naps during daytime when being unfolded), can all fit in there. And there is still room for me , even for my hubby to squeeze in and interact with her. It helps me a lot during daytime specially with two dogs running around in the house all day long. At least I don't have to worry about my baby girl getting knocked over and hurt by the dogs. I wish I had fund this product when I had my first two kids nine years ago.


I love this play yard!!! So let me start off by saying with our first child we had the similar product that Summer Infant makes. In order to set that one up or take it down, you had to flip the playard over , and move like 8 straps on and off the “legs”. We only used it with 1 child, for about a year, and only indoors with no excess force used on it. 2 of the straps broke and Summer Infant wouldn’t stand by their product and give me a replacement because I didn’t have the receipt or could prove it was still within their “warranty” (it was a gift from my mother in law). I have since boycotted Summer Infant because it was a $100 product that didn’t last. We also only used it on carpet and small holes were forming in the bottom canvas. It was ... full review
Check the production date and packaging. Buy the play yard with the most recent date of manufacture. The Juvenile Products Manufacturers Association certifies that some brands meet current voluntary safety standards for play yards. This certification is not required by law and is not supervised by any government agency. Still, we feel a JPMA certification sticker offers some assurance that a product meets the safety standard. The play yard standard addresses design problems of earlier models, such as inadequate locking devices or protrusions that can snag clothing and create a strangulation hazard.
As Ann Hulbert documents in Raising America: Experts, Parents, and a Century of Advice About Children, this sort of confused and conflicted debate has long been a touchstone of the parental advice genre. In Anxious Parents, Peter Stearns notes that where parents once put children in playpens to safeguard them from dangerous household equipment, as that household equipment was made more accident-proof, the playpen itself soon began to be seen as the source of danger—both literally, as in a series of high-profile recalls of poorly designed playpens and playards, and figuratively, as a symbol of damaging neglect.
Check the production date and packaging. Buy the play yard with the most recent date of manufacture. The Juvenile Products Manufacturers Association certifies that some brands meet current voluntary safety standards for play yards. This certification is not required by law and is not supervised by any government agency. Still, we feel a JPMA certification sticker offers some assurance that a product meets the safety standard. The play yard standard addresses design problems of earlier models, such as inadequate locking devices or protrusions that can snag clothing and create a strangulation hazard.
Be sure to check the floor pad. It should also be no more than 1-inch thick, snug-fitting, and firm enough to protect your baby from falling or rolling into the loose mesh pocket that can form between the edge of the floor panel and side of the play yard (a suffocation hazard). We think it's safer when models have slots on the floor that allow the mattress's Velcro strips to be inserted and secured on the outside of the play yard, making it difficult for a baby or toddler to lift the mattress and possibly become trapped under it. Avoid models with a mattress that fastens to the bottom of a play yard only with Velcro pads that a child can access from the inside. Use only the mattress or pad that comes with your play yard.

I LOVE THIS!! I have 8 month old twin boys who are getting bigger by the day! They were starting to look a little cramped in their pack and play, so I decided to look for something bigger. I was originally looking at the Joovy Room2, but it is soooooo expensive. This one is awesome for A LOT cheaper. The cheaper price definitely doesn't mean cheaper quality at all. The quality of this exceeded my expectation. My only "complaint," and it isn't really a complaint , is that I wish it had wheels. I was a little worried about the reviews saying how heavy it is, but it actually wasn't as heavy as I thought it would be. I really just drag it around the house. Haven't had to put it in the car and take it anywhere yet. ... full review
My 17 month old granddaughter was only in the play area about 5-10 minutes watching sesame street one morning and got her leg stuck in the space between the rails. The Fire Department had to come and cut the post the free her leg out! I wanted to alert the manufacture directly but I was unable to locate a website or Facebook page. The spaces between the rails need to be closer! We loved this play area until we felt a safe zone became an unsafe zone.
When your baby is a newborn putting them low to floor can cause major strain on your back so you'll want to shop for a playard that has two levels so you can have them higher when they are younger and then move them lower when they learn to roll over. This model from the popular Graco line does all of this at a reasonable price and has some added features like a mobile and pockets on the side to store, diaper, wipes and such. 
As much as I wanted to, it’s impossible to keep your eyes on your toddler 24/7. It is not even possible to take a shower peacefully or make a delicious dinner, for that matter, it is not possible to do any other daily chores when your toddler is crawling every corner of your house. That is why many people today are finding this playpen as a better solution to keep your toddler safe and also to do their chores peacefully.

Most play yards are designed for portability—to fit through a door, be moved from one room to another, or folded up to fit in the trunk of your car. Many are rectangular, usually 28 by 40 inches. A basic model such as the Cosco Funsport Travel Play Yard (about $55) has mesh on all sides and comes with a travel bag. Another lightweight model, Graco's Pack ‘n Play Playard/Circle Time (about $57), weighs about 20 pounds.


If a quick DIY play yard better suits your requirement then make one at home with an inflatable plastic kiddy pool. In case you have a kid’s plastic pool lying around in your house, then you can inflate it and convert into a play yard. Simply inflate the plastic frame, place a soft blanket or mattress inside it, and you just made a safe and comfortable place for your baby to play. Just make sure the walls of the pool are high enough to prevent your baby from crawling out. Also keep all sharp and pointy things away from the pool.
I used this playpen at work for a year. Purchased when my daughter was almost a year old. I had to take it in and out of my car everyday at work and I was worried that it wouldn't hold up due to it being hollow plastic. I was pleasantly surprised! It held up so well that I will be able to use it again for the next baby. My daughter is now two and knows how to stack things so she can climb out and she's tall. However she has never been able to figure out how to unlock the gate. All the toys on the toy panel still work and have held up despite my daughter being rough with them. None of the connector pegs have come off during transport. I really worried they would pop off since they weren't solid and were jostled in my car all the time!
Absolutely beautiful playard baby is due next month and this has all the essentials I need to make it an easier time. At $118 I really couldn't turn this down I haven't used the electronic parts yet as I need batteries (D battery for bouncer and AA for the one on the rail) all in all I would buy this again if I ever need a new one 😍 The may for this is super soft and comfortable for any baby
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